By Alice Sholl

Common phrases you’re probably saying wrong

quill,writing

It’s easy to mess up common phrases, but using them too often can lead you down a dusty road (or is it a downward spiral?) of mistakes and errors. This LifeHack article reveals some common phrases that people frequently get wrong and the ones people get wrong so often that they’ve actually ended up being the norm.

The phrases on the left are incorrect, the ones on the right are correct.

1. I could care less vs. I couldn’t care less

Saying that you could care less about a topic implies that you do care about it at least a little. What you usually mean is that you don’t care about the topic at all, hence “I couldn’t care less”.

2. One in the same vs.One and the same

When you really sit and think about it, “one in the same” doesn’t mean anything at all. The correct phrase “one and the same” means that two things are the same.

3. Statue of limitations vs. Statute of limitations
Whenever I think of these two phrases, I get reminded of one of the best Seinfeld episodes ever.

4. For all intensive purposes vs. For all intents and purposes

You may feel very strongly and intense about your purpose, but that doesn’t make the phrase correct. Another common incorrect use of the phrase is switching the words “for” and “with”. The correct phrase means that you are covering all possibilities and circumstances.

5. Extract revenge vs. Exact revenge

When you extract something, you’re taking it out of something else. When you exact onto something, you’re dishing it out. Therefore, extracting revenge on someone would mean you’re taking out that person’s revenge. Exacting revenge onto them means that you’re taking your revenge out on them.

6. I’m giving you leadway vs. I’m giving you leeway

Leadway actually isn’t even a word. Leeway means extra space and freedom.

7. Expresso vs. Espresso

I’m sure those of you who work at coffee shops have had people order an expresso before. There’s no such drink. The drink you’re trying to order is an espresso.

8. Momento vs. Memento

Momento isn’t a word. A memento is a keepsake.

9. Irregardless vs. Regardless

Regardless means without regard. Throwing on “IR” to the beginning makes the word a double negative. I think we can all agree that “without without regard” doesn’t make sense.

 

 

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