By Cameron Kilmister

Survey reveals UK is third best country in Europe to find a job

boardroom,office,meeting

The UK is one of the best countries in Europe in which to find job, according to new research.

According to the Independent, a report from Glassdoor Economic Research has shown that the UK is the third best for finding work out of 16 European countries.

The UK offers the best job prospects together with Estonia, Norway and Austria, according to Glassdoor. The research is based on key employment indicators such as unemployment rates, involuntary part-time work and the employment gap, which compares current employment rates to pre-crisis ones.

The labour market in the UK has some major advantages such high levels of education and training and low levels of temporary work, the survey finds.

Greece and Spain have high unemployment rates affecting around 25% of the workforce, but the UK is in a much better position, with only around six per cent of the active population out of work.

The UK also has a relatively low rate of youth unemployment down to 17% from 20% in 2011-2012. In Spain in Greece and Greece these numbers are above 50% and over 40% in Italy.

Temporary contracts often mean difficult working hours, little flexibility, low pay and job security. While Estonia and the UK have also the lowest proportions of temporary employment workers at three per cent, they are most common in Spain, the Netherlands, and Portugal, affecting more than two in ten employed.

According to Glassdoor chief economist Dr Andrew Chamberlain, the European labour market is diverse and presents both challenges and opportunities for job seekers.

“On the one hand, countries like the UK, Germany, Austria and Switzerland enjoy below average unemployment.

“By contrast, Greece, Spain and Portugal have continued to struggle with double-digit unemployment and slow economic growth—partly due to inflexible labour market regulations that have proven difficult to reform in recent years,” he said.

This entry was posted in Work
  • CURRENT ISSUE:

    Current Issue

  • Follow us

    Friend me on FacebookFollow me on TwitterJoin my group on LinkedIn